Welcome

WASHINGTON VILLAGE IS A SIX-BLOCK, MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTH BOSTON THAT WILL HELP ADDRESS THE NEED FOR MIDDLE-INCOME HOUSING NEAR PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION IN THE CITY OF BOSTON. OUR GOAL IS TO CREATE A DIVERSE MIX OF RESIDENCES FOR FIRST-TIME HOMEBUYERS, RENTERS AND LONGTIME AREA RESIDENTS OF ALL AGES. WITH ROBUST PUBLIC OPEN SPACE AND VIBRANT RETAIL USES, WASHINGTON VILLAGE WILL REPLACE AN UNDERUTILIZED INDUSTRIAL SITE WITH A COMMUNITY-BASED DEVELOPMENT THAT WILL TRANSFORM THIS AREA INTO A PLACE FOR RESIDENTS TO COME TOGETHER.

Our Vision

The vision for Washington Village is to improve the quality of life in the area through a five-acre mixed-used development in South Boston’s Andrew Square that would transform largely vacant industrial buildings into a new community destination that will include a public park, middle-class apartments and condominiums, and potential amenities such as a grocery store and local retailers. There will be parking for those who will live and visit there, community open space, more than 170 trees, and better connectivity to the surrounding neighborhood via new pedestrian ways and public streets. The idea is to create a walkable neighborhood with community-serving businesses. Our vision includes a central meeting place with a range of programming, where longtime area residents and new residents alike can meet for coffee, buy food at a farmers market, ice skate, attend a car show or an art show.

Our vision also includes two important neighborhood institutions, we will provide a new home for the South Boston Historical Museum and a satellite location for South Boston Community Health Center.

Our Team

David PogorelcTim MackieDavid ChilinskiDave NaglePeter Considine

David Pogorelc

DJ Properties

David has extensive experience in real estate. His 25-year career began while he was still a student at Bryant University. His modest start has given him a passion for creating middle-income housing. Today, he is a founder of Core Investments in Boston. Prior to founding Core Investments, David was a founder and partner at Helm Investments, a real estate investment firm focusing on residential properties in Boston. David is a proud supporter of numerous local and national charitable organizations, including Smile Train, Project Bread, Special Olympics, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Feed the Children, Food for the Poor, Salvation Army, Wounded Warrior Project, Soldiers’ Angels, Veterans of Foreign Wars, The Covenant House, and Catholic Relief Services.

Tim Mackie

DJ Properties

A graduate of Wentworth Institute of Technology, Tim joined Core in 2005 with an extensive background in residential and commercial construction management. He has over 15 years of experience managing residential and commercial projects in the greater Boston area. Tim heads up Core’s asset operations managing development, construction and property operations. Tim brings excellent organizational, management and leadership skills to each phase of the development and construction process.  He has deep knowledge and experience successfully navigating the complex permitting and entitlement process in the city of Boston.

David Chilinski

Prellwitz Chilinski Associates Inc.

David Chilinski, PCA’s President and Co-founder, has practiced architecture, interiors and urban design for over thirty years. He guides the firm with an infectious entrepreneurial spirit and unwavering commitment to creating vibrant, sustainable community places – from commercial and retail developments to housing and educational buildings. He is a graduate of Renselear Polytechnic Institute, and holds a National Council of Architectural Registration Boards Certificate with registration in seventeen states. He also serves on the Massachusetts College of Art Corporate Advisory Group and the United Way Real Estate Committee.

Dave Nagle

Community Liaison

Dave spent six years as the chief of staff for the chair of the City Of Boston Economic and Planning Committee. He has worked on numerous large projects throughout the city including Liberty Mutual World Headquarters, Vertex Seaport, MCCA Expansion project, State Street Headquarters, Waterside Place, Prudential Center Expansion and numerous neighborhood projects

Peter Considine

The Dartmouth Company

Since 2004, Peter Considine, has been working with the Dartmouth Company managing relationships with national and regional retailers and institutional landlords. Peter exclusively works with retailers and landlord’s including Dick’s Sporting Goods, Lifetime Athletic, Kohl’s, Capital One Bank, National Amusements, Inc, DDR, and The Bulfinch Companies. Peter has significant experience in land assemblage, site identification, and deal negotiation – he is particularly focused on long–term strategic planning. Peter is a Vice President at The Dartmouth Company, has BA from Hamilton College and an MBA from Boston University. He is active in the Urban Land Institute, International Council of Shopping Center.

Location

The Washington Village development site is located at the intersection of Old Colony Avenue and Dorchester Street in the Andrew Square neighborhood in South Boston. The site consists of five industrial buildings, all of which are empty except for the Drive In Paint-Mart on Dorchester Street that will be relocated within the Washington Village development.

History

of Washington Village

The Native Americans called it Mattapannuck. This was a stretch of land at the base the isthmus we now call South Boston. In Colonial times, the land was used as an orchard and a pasture, and there was a large stretch of meadow, all close to the harbor and the abundant seafood that the Atlantic provided. Of course, a village sprang up around these resources. Its 1,300 inhabitants called the place Little Neck. But it wasn’t until 1850, 74 years after George Washington’s troops won a key standoff up the street on Dorchester Heights, forcing the British troops to evacuate the harbor on March 17, 1776, that a new name emerged in honor of the Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army: Washington Village. The residents of Little Neck asked the City of Boston to annex their community (which it did in 1855) and name it after the first President of the United States.

However, the Washington Village name slowly faded after the area become more industrial. In the mid-19th century, the site was evolving into less of a place where people lived and more of an industrial center where canons were forged, glass was blown, wood was turned, and cows were milked in greater numbers (the Hood Milk Barn stood on the site.)

The name morphed to honor John Andrew, the governor of Massachusetts during the Civil War and whose name is on the nearby Red Line stop, which was completed in 1918. Since that time, the site has been home to a Westinghouse engine factory, Crown Uniform & Linen Service, Adams Transmission, and Winthrop Press. Railroad tracks once regularly brought trains in and out of the site to service these industries daily, remnants of which you can still see on the site today, which now sits vacant.

Today, with hundreds of homes, shops, new trees and community gathering space transforming the area again, we’re pleased our new (old) name reflects the village we strive to be.

FAQ

Who is the developer? What is their history/experience?
What is the vision?
Where is the site?
How many buildings will be there?
How many housing units will be there?
How tall will the buildings be?
Have you met with the community?
What type of retail will you have?
Will this development displace any industrial businesses?
What is the timeframe for construction?
What are the community benefits?

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